Tag Archives: travel

W. D. Mast Author and Photographer- POSTCARDS HOME 

POSTCARDS HOME

by W. D. Mast

A book of adventures  Join me traveling to over 125 countries.

“One of life’s many joys is sharing adventures, discoveries, and experiences. Come wander the world with me through image and story. I hope you enjoy the journey!”

http://www.WDMAST.com

MY WEB GALLERY
http://www.Mastphotography.topic.com

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D. R. Randell Author- THAI TWIST

THAI TWIST

by D. R. Randell

D. R. Randell’s YA Romance THAI TWIST has recently been accepted by Breathless Books (Assent Publishing).  For recent high school graduate Gina Campanello, winning a trip for two to Thailand seems more like a chore than a prize.  The country is a long plane ride from her home in Tucson, and besides, she’d rather stay in town and flirt with college boys.  Before Gina leaves, a neighbor asks her to deliver a small package to a long-lost brother.  Intrigued, Gina arrives in Bangkok with a purpose.  While her man she’s looking for lives in Chiang Mai, she’s en route to Phuket!  She spends the rest of the trip unraveling the mysterious connections between her neighbor and her Thai counterpart.

The novel celebrates travel and a spirit of adventure.  Gina’s misconceptions about the target culture initially throw her off track, but after she begins to see Thailand through a native’s eyes, she develops a deeper appreciation for her new surroundings.  For more information visit drransdellnovels.com

Taken from THE WRITEWORD, the newsletter of The Society of Southwestern Authors  Vol. 42.  No. 6.  December 2013/ January 2014

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Peggy and Randy Ford Authors- FOUND OUR WAY 27th Installment

Anyway, to continue our journey. We got to Kuala Lumpur about noon. We were told that the YMCA would be cheap, but we had no idea where to look for it. KL was a city of 450,000 then … much smaller than Manila or Singapore but certainly too large to just ride around hunting for the YMCA. We stopped and I went into a shop to see if I could get us located and call the Y. Eventually I came out with a fellow who was willing to lead us with his jeep. That involved navigating a huge viaduct, where we thought every highway in the whole nation came together. Somehow we got to the Y, but the room was $18 (Malay) a night. So we set out to find a cheaper one.

About a block away were two Chinese hotels, both of which had double rooms for $5 (Malay). That was more than we wanted to pay, but we figured that in the city we wouldn’t do any better. The place where we stayed gave us a bargain by giving us a room with a bath. This was our home for the next five nights. We soon noticed that all sorts of suspicious looking females were coming and going, but we didn’t bother them and they didn’t bother us.

The experience on the viaduct scared Peggy so much (she was almost run over by a motorcycle) that she wanted to leave the bikes behind when we went out to explore the city. But I got my way, and we learned how to navigate KL by bicycle. The first couple of days we carried our bikes down a long fight of steep stairs in order to avoid the viaduct, but we soon learned another way around it. We discovered that many of the major streets had wide sidewalks intended for bicycles. The curbs had driveway-like places for bikes (called curb cuts in America). They even had traffic lights for bikes: when they turned green, they had a picture of a bike showing. There were so many bikes around that motorists knew how to watch out for them, and 9 out of 10 cars seemed to be a bug, making passing on the highway much easier.

I was really enjoying the food in Malaysia, and Peggy was learning to like it. We ate some Chinese food, which wasn’t usually very spicy. We especially enjoyed their soups, in which the vegetables were still crunchy. Both Malay and Indian foods were very hot and spicy for Peggy. A favorite Malay dish of ours was satay and consisted of small pieces of chicken or mutton on a stick and barbecued. It was supposed to be eaten with a spicy peanut sauce, but Peggy liked it without the sauce.

Many of our meals were Indian. One of our favorites was murtaba, made with onions, mutton, sometimes hot peppers … all cooked together inside a pie-crust affair on a hot griddle. The crust was thin and usually crisp. The Indians didn’t eat as much rice as did Malays or Filipinos. They varied rice with bread (we didn’t then know the real word for it. In India or before then, we learned the bread was called chapati.). It was something like the crust of murtaba, but it wasn’t crisp. Small pieces were torn off and used to pick up pieces of meat or vegetable dishes.

5. When we left KL we crossed the country to the East Coast. Since the center of the country was all mountains, we rode a bus most of the way, with our bikes on top. We were shocked to have to pay $4.25 (Malay) a piece for the bikes (the passenger fare was $5), but we didn’t think we could make 165 miles over mountains on our own leg power. At some point, on top of a mountains we got off the bus and were riding our bicycles, and passed a sign pointing the way to see tapirs, when we heard Neil Armstrong had just stepped onto the moon.

5. East Coast, Kuantan. It was 236 miles to the northern most town (Kota Bharu) on this side of the country. We planned to work our way up, stopping whenever people were friendly or there was a town we particularly liked. (Along the way we rode along the ocean, stayed at a palm oil plantation, and watched a man harvest coconuts using a monkey. Instead of the man the monkey climbed the trees and shook the coconuts free.) A lot of craftwork (weaving and silver work) was done on this side, and people were extra friendly.

From the north we thought we’d take a train south that went through the jungle and through the center of the country. If it weren’t too expensive, we wanted to stop in a national park where we thought we could bike through the jungle and watch wild animals from a blind. We planned to eventually end up back in KL to check for mail and apply for visas to Thailand. We weren’t sure how long it would take us to get back there.

Randy and Peggy Ford

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Earl Pomeroy Author- IN THE SEARCH OF THE GOLDEN WEST

IN SEARCH OF THE GOLDEN WEST

The Tourist in Western America, Second Edition

by Earl Pomeroy

Preface to the Bison Books edition by the author

Introduction by William Deverell

“Pomeroy has given us an acute, engaging, and provocative book: a lively look at ourselves as dudes and dude-wranglers over a century in which both time and tide were westward running.”- Saturday Review

$19.95

University of Nebraska Press

http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu

800-848-6224

publishers of Bison Books

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Kelly Lewis Author- GO! GIRL GUIDES: A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO TRAVELING TO THAILAND

GO! GIRLS GUIDES: A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO TRAVELING IN THAILAND

by Kelly Lewis

“The first Go! Girl guidebook helps women navigate their travel with information about major things in foreign countries where women are considered men’s property, and hygiene and health issues.”

What: GO! GIRLS GUIDES: A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO TRAVELING IN THAILAND book release party includes Thai-inspired cuisine, live music, and raffles including apparel and travel-related items including a donated travel pack from Eagle Creek.

When: 6 p.m. Saturday September 17, 2011

Where: La Cocina at Old Artisans, 201 N. Court Ave. Tucson, Arizona

Cost: Free

The guide: Online at gogirlguides.com for $24.99, individual chapters for download at $1.99. Guidebooks will be for sale at the release party.

Taken from the Arizona Daily Star

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Karla Lehmann Author- RITA THE BIRD DOG Books

RITA THE BIRD DOG Books

by Karla Lehmann

Learning through Travel, Language, and Song

The Rita the Bird Dog character is a commemorative to Karla’s pet Weimaraner of 16 years.

KLehmann@GeographicTongueEditions.com

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Geographic Tongue, LLC- HOME OF RITA THE BIRD DOG BOOKS

GEOGRAPHIC TONGUE, LLC HOME OF THE BIRD DOG BOOKS

Follow the travels of Rita the Bird Dog while she explores different geographic areas and studies the plants, animals, and culture.

Learning through:

* Travel

* Language

* Song

* Educational downloads

* Craft projects

* English/German/Spanish vocabulary

* Rita’s travel logs

http://www.GeographicTongueEditions.com

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