Tag Archives: Mexican Revolution

Authors Ron and Sue Bridgemon, Jan and Russ Diers, Katie Iverson and John Gentile- THE MAGNETISM OF MATA ORTIZ PLACES, PEOPLE, AND POTTERY

THE MAGNETISM OF MATA ORTIZ PLACES, PEOPLE, AND POTTERY

Including the Mexican Revolution in the Region

INTRODUCING THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THE MATA ORTIZ REGION, ITS PEOPLE, AND ITS ART

by Ron and Sue Bridgemon, Jan and Russ Diers, Katie Iverson and John Gentile

This complete guide includes:

. updated information and photos of the newest potters

. a guide to the activities in the region

. a “time traveler’s” visit to the 1300 AD Paquime village

. insights into the collaboration of Mata Ortiz potters

. stories by Spencer MacCallum about early days of Mata Ortiz pottery

. rich details of the area’s importance in the Mexican Revolution

. maps, photographs, illustrations

Order at http://www.MagnetismOfMataOrtiz.com

164 pages 8.5″x11″ soft cover

$29.95 (wholesale prices available)

http://www.magnetismofmataortiz.com

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Ben F. Williams Jr. Author- PANCHO VILLA: A LIFETIME OF VENGEANCE

Ben F. Williams, Jr.’s new book, PANCHO VILLA: A LIFETIME OF VENGEANCE, has the infamous revolutionary weaving his evil heart in and out of an american family tapestry. The author spins the tales of his own boyhood years growing up in the southwestern corner of Arizona and Sornora, Mexico. Through facts and memorable reality from his parents and lifelong friends, Williams’ stories follow the crazed Pancho Villa from his earliest days of life, through war and survival along the border lands. Williams includes horrific tales of Villa’s famous battles and his growing eccentric and violent behavior , as personal cruelty and murders increase.

This well-researched book culminates with little-known truths about the disappearance of Pancho Villa’s skull-from his tomb to Parral, Mexico.

In his third book, Ben discloses a wealth of information about what it was like for a boy and family to ranch, mine, and survive during Mexican revolutionary times. Against this background, he not only tackles stories about Pancho Villa’s battles and the man accused of stealing Villa’s skull from his grave, but he baits the reader with the most curious story of all. Who was the accused fhief of the skull. Emil Holmdahl? And what was his connection to Ben F. Williams-the author’s father? And where is the skull today?

Taken from THE WRITE WORD, the newsletter of The Society of Southwestern Authors Vol. 40. No. 1. Feb-March 2011

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