Tag Archives: Irish Songs

Mattie Lennon Irish Author- THE HILLS ABOVE THE VALLEY

THE HILLS ABOVE THE VALLEY.

By Mattie Lennon.

   Some years ago I was producing a DVD Sunrise on the Wicklow Hills” and it was a struggle to get fourteen or fifteen Wicklow songs. It would appear that there was a dearth of songwriters in the Garden County.  All that has changed. Wicklow singer/songwriter Barry Kinane is bringing out an album, “The Hills above the Valley.”

    All are Wicklow songs which, in the true ballad tradition, tell tales of love, hardship, tragedy, hope and humour.

The Hills Above the Valley.

Where Brook waters Flow.

Biddy Mulvey and the Landgrabber.

Mrs O’s Delight.

Mary.

Cockahoof.

The Ballyknockan Band.

Ballinahown.

A Stonecutter’s Journey.

Madonna and Lion.

 All tracks are composed by Barry.

  Barry, who grew up in Ballyknockan is married with two children and lives in Carrigacurra, overlooking the beautiful Blessington Lakes.   He has been a songwriter and composer of music most of his life and I started playing in bands as a teenager.

     In the past decade he has released eight albums, five with critical acclaimed band Glyder, a solo album, a project album with “Maggie Simpson” and an album with The Whole Hog Band. His music has been played on BBC, RTE and their equivalent stations in Sweden, Germany and Norway as well as rock shows all over the world. A track was played on the legendary “Nights with Alice Cooper” show which was syndicated all over the world. While in Glyder he toured all over Europe and opened for international acts like Metallica, Slash, Thin Lizzy and many more. Glyder were a well-respected band in the rock scene in UK and Europe and the albums were released internationally on SPV (Steamhammer) for Europe and USA and JVC Victor for Asia. In 2010 I released a solo album, “A lifetime to Kill” described as “folk prog” by Hot Press magazine. It featured Johnny Cash’s bass player Dave Rorick as well as top Irish musicians Rob Strong and Pat McManus. It got favourable press and some airplay in Ireland on RTE and regional shows.

   He recently released a country and Bluegrass album, which he recorded and produced in his own studio with The Whole Hog Band album called “Ordinary Days”. It features some of Ireland’s finest bluegrass musicians. It received the award of best debut album at the Leinster Entertainment Awards.

Barry has  been finalist in many song writing competitions and in 2014  won the prestigious  Sean McCarthy Ballad writing competition in Listowel, Co. Kerry, says “ I have written in many styles ranging from rock, folk, country, metal, pop and soul.”

   The CD is due for release in Mid-November and will be available from Barry at; bat.kinane@gmail.comBarry

Mattie Lennon

mattielennon@gmail.com

 

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Mattie Lennon Irish Poet/Songwriter- The DVD SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS, Will Be Broadcast

SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS, the DVD, will be broadcast at 7.00 PM (Irish time) every evening , for a week, from Sunday 23rd December, 2012.  online at http://www.anlar.tv,

Mattie Lennon <mattielennon@gmail.com>;

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Mattie Lennon Irish Author/Poet- THE QUIET MAN

THE QUIET MAN

By Mattie Lennon

But dreams don’t last —
Though dreams are not forgotten —
And soon I’m back to stern reality.
But though they pave the footways here with gold dust,
I still would choose the Isle of Inisfree.

When Maurice Walshe came up with The Quiet Man as a title for one of his stories he could have been using an appropriate sobriquet for the man who was to become famous through the John Fords film of Walsh’s story. If you have ever visited a shop in Galway or watched TV on a Christmas day you are no doubt familiar with the movie.

But Dick Farrelly, the quiet unassuming man, wrote more than two hundred other songs. He was born on (17 February 1916 His parents were publicans and when Dick was twenty-three he left Kells, County Meath for Dublin to join an Garda Siochana on Wednesday 04th April 1942. He served in various Garda stations, Clontarf, Pearse Street, Bridewell, Sundrive Road and Donnybrook, throughout his thirty-eight year career, ending up in the Carriage Office in Dublin Castle. He was a private, modest and shy man who wrote over two hundred songs and poems during his lifetime. He married Anne Lowry from Headford, Co.Galway in 1955 and the couple had five children. His two sons Dick and Gerard are professional musicians.

On a bus journey from his native Kells, Dick Farrelly got the inspiration for his now timeless composition the “Isle of Innisfree” and by the time he reached Dublin he had written the words and music. Farrelly’s poignant words express the longing of an Irish emigrant for his native land. It was first sung by Joe Cummisky, a Guard and fellow Kells man in the Vincent de Paul Hall, in Kells on Saint Patrick’s Day, It was recorded by Bing Crosby for whom it became a huge international hit. It has since been recorded by a great many artists worldwide but above all, it endures in the hearts of many to this day as one of the great songs of Ireland.

Professor Des MacHale who writes extensively on Dick Farrelly in his book, “Picture The Quiet Man”, goes on to say – “Film director John Ford heard it and loved it so much that he decided to use it as the principle musical theme of The Quiet Man… The melody is featured at least eleven times throughout the film, including its use during the opening sequence. “Sadly the composer of The Isle of Innisfree, Richard Farrelly received no mention in the screen credits”. (Victor Young was credited with the full musical score.) In more recent times “Isle of Innisfree” is also used in the film E.T. (1982) where a scene from The Quiet Man is shown, and again the melody can be heard in the soundtracks of the films, Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) and Breakfast on Pluto (2005).

A few years earlier in 1948, Anne Shelton recorded Dick Farrelly’s first success, “If You Ever Fall in Love Again”, becoming a hit for her in the UK. Guy Lombardo and his Orchestra, and instrumental pop group, The Three Suns, recorded the song in the USA. Other Dick Farrelly songs include, “Cottage by the Lee”, which was popularised by Joe Lynch (singer & actor), and “The Rose of Slievenamon”, recorded by Joseph Locke.

In later years he wrote “The Gypsy Maiden” recorded by Diarmuid O’Leary & The Bards, The Irish Descendants and Sinead Stone & Gerard Farrelly.

“Annaghdown” was recorded by Larry Cunningham reaching No 6 in the Irish charts, Sonny Knowles and Sinead Stone & Gerard Farrelly and “Man of the Road” was recorded by The Café Orchestra featuring singer Sinead Stone and a Scottish release by singer Julie Keen.

“We Dreamed our Dreams”, was written by Dick in 1988. It was first recorded by The Fureys & Davy Arthur in that same year. There are also recordings by Sean Keane, Cathy Ryan, The BBC Radio Orchestra featuring Finbar Furey on an album of the same title. There is also a highly acclaimed interpretation of this song by Sinéad Stone and Dick’s son, musician Gerard Farrelly on their album “Legacy of a Quiet Man”. The album is a collection of songs written by Dick Farrelly and was the subject of an RTE television documentary ‘Nationwide’. In July 2011 “We Dreamed our Dreams” was covered by Maura O’Connell/Cherish The Ladies in the US.

Dick Farrelly was involved in the Castlebar International Song Contest on several occasions coming runner-up in 1968 with “The Gypsy Maiden”, winning the Pop section in 1972 with “That’s What Love is Made Of” sung by Mary Lou and in 1976 his song “Who’s Gonna be the Preacher” reached the finals and was placed 3rd overall.
He also penned songs in the Irish language two of which are “Siobhan” and “Seolta Bána” (meaning, White Sails); both songs are recorded for the first time on the album, Legacy of a Quiet Man.

“The Isle of Innisfree” has been recorded by innumerable artists some of which include: Celtic Woman, Tommy Fleming, Sean Tyrell, Bing Crosby, Sinead Stone & Gerard Farrelly, The Cafe Orchestra, Phil Coulter, Anne Shelton, Vera Lynn, Dublin Screen Orchestra – (“The Quiet Man” soundtrack album), Connie Francis, Joe Loss & His Orchestra, Eamonn Cambell, James McNally, Finbar Furey, Paddy Reilly, Frank Patterson, Norrie Paramor & His Orchestra, RTÉ Concert Orchestra, Paddy Cole, Diarmuid O’Leary, Joseph Locke, Charlie Landsborough, Val Doonican, Daniel O’Donnell, Geraldo & His Orchestra, James Galway, John McNally, Jimmy Young, Victor Young & His Singing Strings, The Irish Tenors, Glen Curtin, Dublin City Ramblers, Sean Dunphy, Jimmy Griffin, Tony Kenny and Alec Finn to name but a few.

Many commentators have told stories of Dick over the years. But one of the people closest to him, his son Gerard, told me, “ My father was very unassuming and quite a shy man. Very much a family man, he loved nature and loved animals. I started playing drums when I was a teenager and Dad was great. He used to drive me around with the kit to band rehearsals etc. He was very laid back about certain things, for example, I remember one time, watching something on television about the great Nat King Cole and out of the blue he said in his own soft way, “I met him once, he was a really lovely man”… It surprised me that I was only hearing about it then and of course I wanted to know more, he was like that”. He liked to play the piano just for his own pleasure, playing mostly songs from the great American songbook era, or if he was working on a new song. But, he didn’t play very often. He would sometimes finish a song, words and music without ever going near the piano at all, which amazed me. You would often see him watching the television and taking a pen and a piece of paper out of his pocket and putting down an idea for a song, a bit of melody, a title or some words. He hated being asked to play in front of others or at an event, he wasn’t comfortable with performing. I remember he was involved in the Castlebar Song Contest on several occasions. Along with my sister Carol we helped Dad record the song demos in the house. Carol sang and I played the drums at the time and we would rehearse the song, but when it was time to record he would get a bit nervous and that would annoy him, something many a musician is familiar with! Mam was from the west and he loved it there and loved Lough Corrib and of course so much of “The Quiet Man” was filmed around there.”

Dick Farrelly died on Saturday 11 August 1990,(1990-08-11) aged 74. Even if his name didn’t appear on a poster with John Wayne, Maureen O‘Hara et all the quiet man from Kells has left a lasting legacy.

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Mattie Lennon Irish Author/Poet- Sunrise on the Wicklow Hills 400 Years Of Wicklow Songs And Music

Sunrise on the Wicklow Hills 400 Years Of Wicklow Songs And Music

By Mattie Lennon

County Wicklow inspired John Millington Synge, gave refuge to freedom fighters, welcomed lovers to its hills and valleys and continues to provide tranquility, peace and relaxation for its many visitors.

The loves, battles, disputes and matches of the Garden County have been commemorated in songs (some almost forgotten), which have long been part of the oral tradition of mountain men and mountain women.

Yes, yes, I know. You knew that already. Well, some time ago I came up with a mad idea. You knew that as well because you know that I’m always coming up with mad ideas. As smart as you are I’ll bet you don’t know what the mad idea was. Well I’ll tell you. Wicklow was the last county in Ireland to be instituted. And on the four-hundredth anniversary of the foundation of our beautiful County I hit on the idea of making a DVD to preserve some of its precious stories and legends as told through its ballads.

SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS; This is a classical song, which combines “drawing-room splendour” with the feelings of everyday life.

THE WICKLOW ROVER; Cork had The Bould Thady Quill, its neighbouring county boasted of “The Limerick Rake” and Roundwood songwriter, Pat Molloy, felt compelled to immortalise our very own colourful Wicklow character.

THE VALES AROUND CLOUGHLEA; A thumbnail sketch of West Wicklow life in the early days of the last century drawn, in words, by local songwriter Frank Farrelly. Priest, patriotism and pranks, they are all there.

DERRYBAWN; This beautiful ballad indicates that Wicklow men are still as capable of love, loyalty and valour as were their ancestors.

THE BLACKBIRD OF SWEET AVONDALE; The sad and moving tale of “the uncrowned king of Ireland” is given a new lease of life by award-winning singer Peggy Sweeney.

THE FLOWER OF LUGNAQUILLA; One of our highest mountains is immortalised by this slow jig composed and played, on fiddle, by gold-medallist musician Rachel Conlan.

MY WICKLOW HILLS SO GAY; An emigrant story from our own time told by a Ballyknockan songwriter.

THE BANKS OF AVONMORE; The story of death on an alien battlefield and broken hearts in Wicklow, written by the late Peter Cunningham-Grattan (The Roving Bard)

THE ROSE IN THE HEATHER/PAIDIN O’RAFFERTY (JIGS); Played by Fuinneamh, under the direction of John McNamara.

DOWN BY THE TANYARD SIDE; Composed by celebrated songwriter Ned Lysaght to console his friend Hugh Byrne who was the victim of his sweetheart’s cruel father.

THE WICKLOW MOUNTAINS HIGH; An old sentimental ballad, which has been rescued from the jaws of obscurity.

ANN DEVLIN; Pete St. John composed this lively yet tragic song, thereby ensuring that a brave Wicklow woman would not be airbrushed from history.

THE WICKLOW VALES FOR ME; Even the Creator, it has been said, couldn’t make two hills without a valley. Perhaps that is why man-of-God, Father Butler, a Donard curate, in the last century gave our mountains a rest (in a literary sense) and penned this tribute to the hollows in between.

PROVIDENCE/GRAVEL WALKS (REELS); Played by Fuinneamh under the direction of John McNamara.

The artists featured include Celtic Mist, Shay Eustace, Fifth-generation tenor Denis Molloy, Pianist Bill Kearney, Billy Meade, Fiddle-player Rachel Conlan, Songwriter/singers Patsy McEvoy and Mick Brady and a nine-piece band Fuinneamh. Fuinneamh is the Irish for “energy” and when you hear them play you’ll agree with the choice of name.

Also featured are a number of interviewees who know anything that’s worth knowing about County Wicklow, its songs and songwriters. These include 94-year-old Mona Power recalls her memories of Peter Cunningham-Grattan (The Roving Bard) an enigmatic songwriter and musician who travelled the roads of Wicklow until his death in 1956. Father Padraig McCarthy tells us about the fruits of his research into this prolific man-of-the-roads who kept his cards close to his chest as far as his origins were concerned.

Senator Labras O ‘Murchu, Director General of Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann, gives us the benefit of his knowledge of songs and song-writing in Wicklow and beyond.

Seamus MacMathuna, a great authority on the Irish ballad regales the viewer, from a cheery fireside, with stories of composers past and present.

Mick Brady, reveals where he got the inspiration for an emigration song and singer, writer and historian Shay Eustace tells some lesser-known facts about Ann Devlin.

“Sunrise On The Wicklow Hills” (DVD €20. CD-with 2 bonus tracks; €10. Prices include postage.)
is available from:

Mattie Lennon,
15 Weston Heights,
Weston Park,
Lucan, Co.Dublin,
Ireland.
mattielennon@gmail.com

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Mattie Lennon Irish Author- SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS 400 YEARS OF WICKLOW SONGS

SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS 400 YEARS OF WICKLOW SONGS

by Mattie Lennon

County Wicklow inspired John Millington Synge, gave refuge to freedom fighters, welcomed lovers to it’s hills and valleys and continues to provide tranquillity, peace and relaxation for its many visitors.The loves, battles, disputes and matches of the Garden County have been commemorated in songs (some almost forgotten), which have long been part of the oral tradition of mountain men and mountain women.

Yes, yes, I know. You knew that already. Well, some time ago I came up with a mad idea. Wicklow was the last county in Ireland to be instituted, 400 years ago. And on the four-hundredth anniversary of the foundation of County Wicklow, I produced a DVD to remember, honour and preserve some of its precious stories and legends as told through its ballads.

For months Julie Phibbs, Director of West Wicklow Films, and her team hauled cameras, tripods and a lot of expertise through the briars, ferns and rocks of County Wicklow.

The result is 57 minutes of footage, which — along with old photos and sketches — depicts some of the most beautiful scenery in the world.

This cinematic panorama is accompanied by the following audio tracks:

SUNRISE ON THE WICKLOW HILLS – This is a classical song, which combines ‘drawing-room splendour’ with the feelings of everyday life.

THE WICKLOW ROVER – Cork had The Bould Thady Quill, its neighbouring county boasted of ‘The Limerick Rake’ and Roundwood songwriter, Pat Molloy, felt compelled to immortalise our very own colourful Wicklow character.

THE VALES AROUND CLOUGHLEA – A thumbnail sketch of West Wicklow life in the early days of the last century drawn, in words, by local songwriter Frank Farrelly. Priests, patriotism and pranks, they are all there.

DERRYBAWN – This beautiful ballad indicates that Wicklow men are still as capable of love, loyalty and valour as were their ancestors.

THE BLACKBIRD OF SWEET AVONDALE – The sad and moving tale of ‘the uncrowned king of Ireland’ is given a new lease of life by award-winning singer Peggy Sweeney.

THE FLOWER OF LUGNAQUILLA – One of the highest mountains is immortalised by this slow jig composed and played, on fiddle, by gold-medallist musician Rachel Conlan.

MY WICKLOW HILLS SO GAY – An emigrant story from our own time told by a Ballyknockan songwriter.

THE BANKS OF AVONMORE – The story of death on an alien battlefield and broken hearts in Wicklow, written by the late Peter Cunningham-Grattan (The Roving Bard)

THE ROSE IN THE HEATHER/ PAIDIN O’RAFFERTY (JIGS) – Played by Fuinneamh, under the direction of John McNamara.

DOWN BY THE TANYARD SIDE – Composed by celebrated songwriter Ned Lysaght to console his friend Hugh Byrne who was the victim of his sweetheart’s cruel father.

THE WICKLOW MOUNTAINS HIGH – An old sentimental ballad, which has been rescued from the jaws of obscurity.

ANN DEVLIN – Pete St. John composed this lively yet tragic song, thereby ensuring that a brave Wicklow woman would not be airbrushed from history.

THE WICKLOW VALES FOR ME – Even the Creator, it has been said, couldn’t make two hills without a valley. Perhaps that is why man-of-God, Father Butler, a Donard curate in the last century, gave our mountains a rest (in a literary sense) and penned this tribute to the hollows in between.

PROVIDENCE/ GRAVEL WALKS (REELS) – Played by Fuinneamh under the direction of John McNamara.

The artists featured include Celtic Mist, Shay Eustace, Fifth-generation tenor Denis Molloy, Pianist Bill Kearney, Billy Meade, Fiddle-player Rachel Conlan, Songwriter/ singers Patsy McEvoy and Mick Brady and a nine-piece band Fuinneamh. Fuinneamh is the Irish for ‘energy’ and when you hear them play you’ll agree with the choice of name.

Also featured are a number of interviewees who know anything that’s worth knowing about County Wicklow, its songs and songwriters. These include 94-year-old Mona Power recalls her memories of Peter Cunningham-Grattan (The Roving Bard) an enigmatic songwriter and musician who travelled the roads of Wicklow until his death in 1956. Father Padraig McCarthy tells us about the fruits of his research into this prolific man-of-the-roads who kept his cards close to his chest as far as his origins were concerned.

Senator Labras O’Murchu, Director General of Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann, gives us the benefit of his knowledge of songs and song-writing in Wicklow and beyond.

Seamus MacMathuna, a great authority on the Irish ballad regales the viewer, from a cheery fireside, with stories of composers past and present.

Mick Brady, reveals where he got the inspiration for an emigration song and singer, writer and historian, Shay Eustace tells some lesser-known facts about Ann Devlin.

‘Sunrise On The Wicklow Hills’ is available from Mattie Lennon, 15 Weston Heights, Weston Park, Lucan, Co.Dublin. info@mattielennon.com , Price; €20 (including P&P).

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Mattie Lennon Author- WHEELS ON HELLS Mr. Haakon Doherty, Professor of Orthopaedics, at Uppsala University, has found evidence in human feet of the evolution of “wheels.”

WHEELS ON HELLS

by Mattie Lennon
Mr. Haakon Doherty, Professor of Orthopaedics, at Uppsala University, has found evidence in human feet of the evolution of “wheels.”

He agrees that it took millions of years for legs to evolve from fins but he has claimed in a recently published paper that the rate of human evolution has accelerated to such an extent that as early as the year 3000 humans will be traveling on their own “wheels.” “One of the causes of the rapid acceleration is the population boom. With more people an advantageous genetic mutation will arise and spread.”

I met the professor in New York, on Saint Patrick’s Day, where he was attending a conference, and I asked him two questions;

“Where did you get your surname?” and “Why have species millions of years older than ourselves not grown wheels?”

He told me that his Grandfather Hugh Doherty was Irish; Editor of the Barnasmore Bugle newspaper in Donegal and when the paper ceased publication he went to Stockholm where he married a Swede.

In answer to my second question he said, “We didn’t grow wheels because there weren’t any roads or flat surfaces until a few thousand years ago, which is the blink of an eye in cosmic terms. When biology was facilitating locomotion the terrain to be negotiated was catered for. Legs, fins and wings were sufficient Evolution adapts us to suit our environment. Adaptation may cause either the gain of a new feature, or the loss of an ancestral feature. If there were motorways a hundred million years ago you and me would be moving around Fifth Avenue on our own “flesh-and-blood roller skates.”

Then, in what he pretended was an afterthought he said, “The larvai of the mother-of-pearl moth (Pleurotya Ruralis,) when startled, will roll itself into a round shape and roll away and the bacterium Escherichia coli moves by spinning filiments called flagella like tiny propellers which rotate at a speed of several hundred times per second.” On seeing that I was taken aback he went on, “if those are not wheels they are fairly bloody close.”

I was wondering about the blood supply but didn’t dare ask the question. The professor read my mind, “ The flesh-and-blood wheel could use the umbilical connection similar to that used on merry-go-rounds.”

Seeing that his erudite instruction was falling on barren ground he gave me a practical demonstration using a CD and one of my shoelaces.

Back in my hotel I checked each foot beneath the ankle bone for traces of the beginning of an “axle” but drew a blank.

A BIO OF SORTS of Mattie Lennon

On Monday, January 10th, 1949, I attained the age of three. I don’t remember it, but I do recall Thursday 13th, it was the Fair-Day in Blessington. When I awoke it was very dark. I made my way into the kitchen, attracted by the yellow glow of lamplight; my feet sensitive to the change of surface as I stepped from the concrete floor of the upper room to the granite paved kitchen. It was not night but morning; a fact proclaimed by my father’s apparel as he sat on a low stool at a military-style bench which on this occasion served as a breakfast table.

The Primary Cert, my first attempt at growing side locks and the feeling that my initial nocturnal adventure into Soho was in some way repugnant to Catechism teaching are all a sort of psychedelic jumble in my brain. Most memories have become blurred on the screen of time, but superimposed there and in no way distorted is my first picture of that big man, with greying hair, eating home-cured rashers from a maidenhair fern plate. The kitchen was devoid of a clock, but he threw the odd glance at the key-winder pocket watch which hung from a bent oval nail on the second shelf of the dresser. (Years later, during one of my unsuccessful attempts at horology I dismantled the faithful chronometer and having reassembled it, had parts left over; Nothing was learned from the operation except that it had been repaired in 1899). When he had mopped up the last drop of grease with a crust of home-made bread, I was to witness a scene that I would see repeated a thousand times. He took each of his boots in turn and placed a couple of small red coals inside each. Then, expertly, he rocked them from heel to toe several times. He replaced the coals in the fire, laced each boot firmly and stamped his feet on the hearth as if to test it.

A full pipe was tamped with his index finger and reddened with a paper spill lit from the glass-bowled oil lamp which stood at his right elbow. My mother often talked of trimming and filling oil-lamps in the house of gentry, yet she hardly ever succeeded in cutting this lamp wick straight across. The result was a diagonal flame.

Then, he took the reins out of the pony’s winkers that hung by the open fire, under the tallague. With the rope he made a head collar, went to the cow house and led out the white head cow. The name was not a misnomer; she was a big red animal, with a white forehead adorned by two sturdy unmatching horns. I was seeing her for the first time; having sprinkled her with Holy Water, from a jam-dish on the windowsill and making the Sign of the Cross on himself, he brought her to the road. The predawn hue was giving way to daylight. It was already bright enough to see the silhouetted paling posts and the stark contour of Black Hill and the stable.

A rat raced across the road. A neighbour cycled past on his way to work. Friendly salutations were exchanged. My mother ushered me back to bed. My first recordable day had begun.

I spent the first 25 years of my life at home on a small farm. I can identify with Patrick Kavanagh’s “burgled bank of youth” (and I am one of the few of my generation who knows how to make a bush-harrow). As a young fellow whenever I was blamed in the wrong, I would compose a derogatory ballad about my accuser. There weren’t many false accusations so I wasn’t very prolific.

I was nicknamed “the Poet” but the term wasn’t always complimentary. I agrees that what is said behind one’s back is their standing in the community and my favourite quotation is a comment made about me by a neighbour: “Wouldn’t you think someone would tell him he’s an eejit, when he doesn’t know himself”.

I have spent most of the last 40 years in Dublin but when asked “Will you ever go back to Kylebeg”? my answer is always Joycean. When James Joyce was asked, in Trieste; “Will you ever return to Dublin?” he said; “I never left”.

I have written articles (mostly humorous) for The Sunday Independent, The Irish Times, The Irish Post, Ireland’s Own, Ireland’s Eye, Kerry’s Eye, The Wicklow People, The Leinster Leader as well as numerous on-line publications. I write a monthly “Irish Eyes” column for the online magazine http://www.pencilstubs.com.

I have written a couple of plays. My “And All his Songs Were Sad” was staged by the Pantagleize Theatre Company in Texas. I produced a DVD “Sunrise on the icklow Hills” and I am planning to record a CD of “Irish ” stories.

I was once told; “You have the perfect face for radio” and I compiled and presented my own programmes in the “Voiceover” series on RTE Radio One. I have presented ballad programmes on Radio Dublin, KIC FM, Liffey Sound and Radio Dublin.

I co-presented a Saint Patrick’s Day Ceol na nGael programme on WFUV 90.7 in the Bronx and I do pre-recorded programmes for other stations. One such programme is “The Story And The Song” in which I play a number of ballads, having first told the story behind each one.
In January 2011 I retired from Dublin Bus after 37 years. I still write the occasional ballad (not all of them fit for human consumption).

Reply to Mattie Lennon at info@mattielennon.com

http://www.mattielennon.com

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